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Celebrate New Zealand Wetlands, for Peat’s Sake

This World Environment Day (June 5), New Zealanders are being urged to celebrate the country’s wetlands, as plans are put in place to protect and restore these vital ecosystems.

Themed ‘Celebrate Biodiversity’, the worldwide UN awareness event aligns with the New Zealand Government’s recent budget announcement, which allocated $1.1 billion to environmental projects. This includes $154 million dedicated to enhancing biodiversity and wetlands, with the creation of 1800 new jobs across the country.

The government’s environmental investment, plus a major international conference on the subject, are expected to be catalysts in improving education and accessibility to wetlands in New Zealand.

The 11th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference, 10-15 Oct 2021 at Te Pae – Christchurch Convention Centre, is expected to attract academics, researchers, and experts from around the world to discuss best practice in wetland research and management.

The conference has been chosen by Tourism New Zealand as one of the pilot events in its Enrich New Zealand - Conference Impact programme, which aims to measure and maximise the positive societal impacts conferences generate to communities, from environmental impact, to public health and job creation.

Conference chair, Dr Philippe Gerbeaux from the Department of Conservation’s Freshwater team, says: “Bringing experts from all around the world will generate some good discussions and outcomes on sustainability practices for our existing wetlands and how to re-develop wetland areas where they can protect us against floods and pollution.

“A traditional knowledge and Mātauranga Māori approach will be drawn on as we discuss sustainable policies for wetlands that best reflect current research and state-of-the-art management practices. This conference will be an excellent opportunity to raise awareness and appreciation of the importance of wetlands in sustaining our New Zealand landscapes and local communities.”

In conjunction with World Environment Day, New Zealand opened the International Peatland Festival on May 31 with a video and presentation showcasing the array of stunning wetlands in New Zealand. Peat Fest is run by RePeat, a youth-led initiative pushing for a shift in how we view, use, and imagine peat wetlands around the world.

More than 90% of New Zealand’s wetlands, including peatlands, have been destroyed in the past couple of centuries.

Karen Denyer, Executive officer for The National Wetland Trust says: “Peat plays an integral part in New Zealand’s wetland ecosystems. These boggy wonders are champions at sequestering carbon, as well as maintaining a range of endemic wildlife and fauna. But if we drain them, they become serious carbon-emitters.

“The Peat Fest opened our eyes to a major agricultural movement in Europe and Asia called paludiculture – re-wetting unsustainably farmed drained peatlands and cropping wet-adapted plants for eco-friendly and carbon-absorbing high value commodities. The potential in Aotearoa NZ is huge, and the tremendous depth of traditional ecological knowledge held by Maori will be key.”

 

View the Why Wetlands video here or at https://www.wetlandtrust.org.nz/